Spring 2015 TLC Events

All Teaching-Learning Center activities will take place in the TLC (Phillips Building, Room 325)
unless otherwise noted.

Registration is required for some TLC activities. Look for the reg req2image on some calendar events.


J A N U A R Y

Tuesday, January 6
9:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
New Faculty Orientation
Presented by Gabby McCutchen, Director, Teaching-Learning Center

All new full-time and part-time instructors are invited to attend New Faculty Orientation. Participants will learn about instructional and student support resources at Durham Tech; meet key college personnel; and review effective strategies for working with adult learners. Light refreshments will be served. RSVP with your Program Director by Friday, January 2 to participate.


Thursday, January 8
2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Set Up Your Sakai Gradebook Right!
Presented by Karen McPhaul, Senior Director, Instructional Technologies

NOTE LOCATION: Tech Building (9), ROOM 965

For complete workshop details and to register, visit http://courses.durhamtech.edu/training/

reg req2In this hands-on session, you’ll learn tips for setting up your Sakai Gradebook to make it easy to manage. We’ll also look at common problems and how to avoid them. Bring your syllabus so we can see your grading structure and advise you on the best way to set it up in Sakai. COMPLETION OF THE INTRO TO SAKAI WORKSHOP IS REQUIRED.


Friday, January 9
9:00 – 10:00 a.m.
Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) Information Session
Presented by Gabby McCutchen, Director, Teaching-Learning Center

This is the only information session scheduled before the February 1 application deadline.

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) is the scholarly study of teaching and learning in higher education. The field of study features (1) research done by classroom instructors and (2) an expectation of publication of the research. All Durham Tech faculty are invited to attend this information session to learn more about SoTL and the upcoming opportunities to participate in a mini-sabbatical from teaching in order to conduct a SoTL project. Participants will learn the eligibility criteria, application process, and the expectations around the SoTL project.


Tuesday, January 20
3:00 – 4:30 p.m.
WEBINAR
Teach Students How To Learn: Metacognition Is The Key!
Presented by Dr. Saundra Yancy McGuire, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Learning and Teaching and Professor of Chemistry at Louisiana State University

From the webinar website: “This webinar is designed to help faculty, learning center professionals and student affairs personnel develop strategies to help students become independent, self-directed learners. A discussion of the characteristics of today’s students will help participants understand why many students lack effective learning strategies when they enroll in college, and how simple it is to teach them strategies for successful learning.” For more information, see the following link: http://www.innovativeeducators.org/Teach-Students-How-To-Learn-Metacognition-p/3284.htm. This webinar has been shown three times in the TLC over the last several semesters and is back by popular demand for this encore presentation. Light refreshments will be provided.


Wednesday, January 28
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Faculty Development Page Turners
Facilitated by Christine Dove, Sociology Instructor; and Lance Lee, Spanish Instructor and Faculty Development Coordinator

Look for monthly discussions of this book on the TLC calendar.

Join Christine and Lance in reading From Brain to Mind: Using Neuroscience to Guide Change in Education by James Zull over the course of the spring 2015 semester. The book discussions will not be extremely formal, but they will foster faculty growth through conversations surrounding this book. Therefore, you should read the designated chapters before the session(s) you plan to attend.

James Zull’s book From Brain to Mind: Using Neuroscience to Guide Change in Education calls for a shift in how we perceive the instruction based on our current neurological understanding of the learning process. He describes the way information moves from working to long-term memory where it becomes part of our knowledge base used to generate new ideas, reason and problem solve.  Zull posits that metacognition lies at the root of all learning and offers educators practical advice on ways to utilize this awareness in transforming the way we perceive teaching and learning.

On this date, participants will discussion the Introduction, Chapter One: the Natural Journey from Brain to Mind, and Chapter Two: The Great Transformation.


Friday, January 30
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Free Tech Training for Instructors: An Overview
Presented by Karen McPhaul, Becky Roehrs, Megan Nicholson, and Gabby McCutchen

Durham Tech instructors have access to a variety of technology-related trainings both on campus and off campus. This information session will highlight several of these training opportunities, including Sakai training, MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses), NC-NET Academies, and Informer training. Bring your own laptop or tablet to explore some of these options during the presentation. All full-time and part-time faculty are encouraged to attend.


F E B R U A R Y


Monday, February 2
1:00 – 2:30 p.m.

Exploring New NC LIVE Resources: A Hands-on Workshop
Presented by Julie Humphrey, Assistant Director, Library

Note Location: ERC Computer Lab, Room 520
(downstairs in the library)

NC LIVE is a consortium providing digital content such as magazines, newspapers, journals, ebooks, and videos to libraries statewide.  In January 2015, NC LIVE will replace the EBSCO resources with ProQuest databases in similar disciplines and subject areas.  New additions to the resources include ebrary Academic Complete eBook subscription, the full Films on Demand streaming video service for academic and public libraries, new science databases, and a language learning tool, Pronunciator, which offers 80 languages.  Come explore these new resources with hands-on time to practice.  Learn how to incorporate these new tools and resources into your teaching.


Thursday, February 5
2:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Angry Black Woman (ABW)/Strong Black Woman (SBW): Stereotype, Myth, or Reality
Presented by Brenda East, Instructor, Psychology

The attribution theory from a psychological perspective suggests that individuals try to explain the behaviors of others. Women are not excluded when applying the theory. However, Black women are more likely to be viewed through the fundamental attribution error (FAE). Albert Ellis, a noted cognitive psychologist, argued that we are guided by our belief systems. Our beliefs are largely responsible for our emotional and behavioral responses. History, research, the media, and cultural applications of the attribution theory have contributed to the perception of Black women, and their concept of self and behaviors. Join us as we explore the importance of identifying Black women as angry and/or strong.


Friday, February 6
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Moving Forward by Looking Back: Portfolios and Professional Reflection
Presented by the Excellence in Teaching Committee

This session will explain how reflecting on one’s own philosophies, teaching strategies and assessments can help improve what we do in the classroom.  In particular, we’ll look at the intention behind portfolio creation as well as the process of creating a teaching portfolio that highlights strengths and growth.  Many faculty report that the portfolio process itself aids in development of a teaching philosophy.  This session may be of particular interest to 2015 EIT award nominees.


Tuesday, February 10
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Academic Support, College Success, and the Loss/Momentum Framework
Presented by Karen Jackson, Director, Center for Academic Excellence

The Loss/Momentum Framework for supporting student success is designed to examine loss points and student progression in order to implement strategies to enable students to maintain their momentum to complete college courses and programs. In this session, you will hear findings from a study of Durham Tech students’ perceptions and use of tools and resources that lead them to successfully complete courses and programs at the community college. Discussion will present findings through the lens of the Loss/Momentum Framework. You will be asked to consider the implications of these findings for your students, with a focus specifically on academic support for student success.


Wednesday, February 11
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Faculty Development Page Turners
Facilitated by Christine Dove, Sociology Instructor; and Lance Lee, Spanish Instructor and Faculty Development Coordinator

Look for monthly discussions of this book on the TLC calendar.

Join Christine and Lance in reading From Brain to Mind: Using Neuroscience to Guide Change in Education by James Zull over the course of the spring 2015 semester. The book discussions will not be extremely formal, but they will foster faculty growth through conversations surrounding this book. Therefore, you should read the designated chapters before the session(s) you plan to attend.

James Zull’s book From Brain to Mind: Using Neuroscience to Guide Change in Education calls for a shift in how we perceive the instruction based on our current neurological understanding of the learning process. He describes the way information moves from working to long-term memory where it becomes part of our knowledge base used to generate new ideas, reason and problem solve. Zull posits that metacognition lies at the root of all learning and offers educators practical advice on ways to utilize this awareness in transforming the way we perceive teaching and learning.

On this date, participants will discussion Chapter Three: Finding the Freedom, Finding the Joy and Chapter Four: Deeper Learning through Integration.


Thursday, February 19
10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Sakai Meetings
Presented by Becky Roehrs, Coordinator, Distance Learning/Learning Technologies Specialist

NOTE LOCATION: Tech Building (9), ROOM 952

For complete workshop details and to register, visit http://courses.durhamtech.edu/training/

reg req2This workshop is an introduction to the Sakai Meetings tool, an open source web-conferencing tool that allows instructors to give online presentations, work with an online whiteboard and chat with remote students. In this hands-on workshop, participants will create a web conference meeting, practice leading a meeting, and attend a meeting as a student, using the Sakai Meetings tool. Participants will upload presentations, use a whiteboard, chat, work with different layouts and share their desktop. COMPLETION OF THE INTRO TO SAKAI WORKSHOP IS REQUIRED.


Thursday, February 19
2:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Walking While Black
Presented by Brenda East, Instructor, Psychology

CANCELED DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER
We apologize for any inconvenience.

Have you ever heard the expression “walking while Black” (WWB)? Black refers to a specific group, which includes Black males at every age. History, research, the media, and culture have significantly influenced how Black males are currently viewed. Skin color rather than external stimuli is the primary motivation for targeting Black males, and the “The Talk” determines the individual’s response. Let us gather for “The Talk”, and gain a better understanding of WWB.


Thursday, February 26
4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
A New Structure for Collaborative and Informed Decision Making at Durham Tech
Presented by
Tom Jaynes, Vice President of Institutional Advancement, and Members of the Council on Committees

CANCELED DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER
Please look for this presentation in the TLC in March and April.

In order to sustain a “culture of involvement;” support Durham Tech’s aim to have “broad participation by Durham Technical Community College employees and students;” and position our college as a first choice for employees in accordance with our new strategic plan, the college will adopt a new infrastructure to foster collaborative and informed decision making.  The Continuous Improvement Infrastructure Team began this work by examining our existing decision making structure at the college and presenting a great, new structure.   The new structure seeks to address the concerns of the campus community and provide guidelines to ensure our current practices match our intentions of promoting broad engagement among faculty, staff and students.  This workshop will provide an introduction to the new structures, expectations, timeline, and opportunities associated with the changes.


Friday, February 27
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Best Practices for Online Testing
Presented by Karen McPhaul, Senior Director, Instructional Technologies

RESCHEDULED DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER
Look for this event on Friday, March 6.

Many instructors have concerns about online tests — and for good reasons: Online tests offer students a variety of cheating opportunities, and students can sometimes encounter technical glitches that may disrupt their test-taking session or cause their answers to be lost. In this session we’ll review best practices instructors can use to deter cheating and minimize technical problems with online tests given through Sakai. We will discuss the pros and cons of various approaches to online testing and look at some new solutions becoming available in the educational technology market. This is not a hands-on training session. Participants will receive a handout detailing recommended test settings to use in Sakai.


M A R C H


Monday, March 2
2:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Multimedia Showcase
Presented Dorothy Wood, Instructor, Biology/Microbiology; Becky Roehrs, Coordinator, Distance Learning; Charlene West, Dean, Career and Technical Programs; and Gabby McCutchen, Instructor, College Success

Faculty from across campus use a variety of multimedia tools to create engaging, web-based instructional modules that support seated, hybrid, and online classes. These tools include Jing, myBrainshark, Snagit, and YouTube My WebCam. During the Multimedia Showcase, instructors will share their creations and discuss their experiences using the products. Please note that this will not be a training session, but it will provide inspiration to attend one of the many upcoming training sessions offered by Instructional Resources.


Thursday, March 5
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
A New Structure for Collaborative and Informed Decision Making at Durham Tech
Presented by
Tom Jaynes, Vice President of Institutional Advancement, and Members of the Council on Committees

In order to sustain a “culture of involvement;” support Durham Tech’s aim to have “broad participation by Durham Technical Community College employees and students;” and position our college as a first choice for employees in accordance with our new strategic plan, the college will adopt a new infrastructure to foster collaborative and informed decision making.  The Continuous Improvement Infrastructure Team began this work by examining our existing decision making structure at the college and presenting a great, new structure.   The new structure seeks to address the concerns of the campus community and provide guidelines to ensure our current practices match our intentions of promoting broad engagement among faculty, staff and students.  This workshop will provide an introduction to the new structures, expectations, timeline, and opportunities associated with the changes.


Friday, March 6
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Best Practices for Online Testing
Presented by Karen McPhaul, Senior Director, Instructional Technologies

Many instructors have concerns about online tests — and for good reasons: Online tests offer students a variety of cheating opportunities, and students can sometimes encounter technical glitches that may disrupt their test-taking session or cause their answers to be lost. In this session we’ll review best practices instructors can use to deter cheating and minimize technical problems with online tests given through Sakai. We will discuss the pros and cons of various approaches to online testing and look at some new solutions becoming available in the educational technology market. This is not a hands-on training session. Participants will receive a handout detailing recommended test settings to use in Sakai.


Wednesday, March 11
10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Intro to Jing Videos for Instruction
Presented by Becky Roehrs, Coordinator, Distance Learning/Learning Technologies Specialist

NOTE LOCATION: Tech Building (9), ROOM 952

For complete workshop details and to register, visit http://courses.durhamtech.edu/training/

reg req2Jing is a free tool that can be used to make short videos (5 minutes or less) to demonstrate how to do tasks on your computer or capture images on your computer. In this workshop we’ll cover uses for the tool in instruction, what’s needed to record a video, how to record a video, and how to add a video to a Sakai course using the Lessons tool. COMPLETION OF THE INTRO TO SAKAI WORKSHOP IS REQUIRED.


Wednesday, March 11
2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Narrating PowerPoints with myBrainshark
Presented by Karen McPhaul, Senior Director, Instructional Technologies

NOTE LOCATION: Tech Building (9), ROOM 965

For complete workshop details and to register, visit http://courses.durhamtech.edu/training/

reg req2myBrainshark is a free online tool that lets you upload PowerPoints to the web and add voice narrations to create multimedia presentations for online teaching or training. In this workshop, we’ll walk you through creating a myBrainshark account, uploading a PowerPoint, recording audio narrations, adding poll questions, editing slides, and sharing your finished presentation with others. Participants may bring their own PowerPoint presentation to work on at the end of the session.


Wednesday, March 18
2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Record Videos with YouTube’s MyWebcam Tool
Presented by Becky Roehrs, Coordinator, Distance Learning/Learning Technologies Specialist

NOTE LOCATION: Tech Building (9), ROOM 952

For complete workshop details and to register, visit http://courses.durhamtech.edu/training/

reg req2YouTube’s MyWebcam tool is a free tool that can be used to record short videos using a webcam. In this workshop we’ll cover uses for the tool in instruction, what’s needed to record a video, how to record a video, and how to add a video to a Sakai course using the Lessons tool. COMPLETION OF THE INTRO TO SAKAI WORKSHOP IS REQUIRED.

Prerequisites: A Gmail account (not a ConnectMail account) is required.


Thursday, March 19
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Advising Refresher
Presented by Jairo McMican, Academic Advisor and College Success Instructor

This workshop will re-introduce returning advisors to key processes in advising at Durham Tech, as well as provide timely advising updates. We will use advising scenarios to work through some of the most common advising challenges, including understanding the new placement options and helping students plan for developmental education coursework. We will also spend time sharing helpful hints with our colleagues and discuss ideas for improving procedures.


Wednesday, March 25
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Faculty Development Page Turners
Facilitated by Christine Dove, Sociology Instructor; and Lance Lee, Spanish Instructor and Faculty Development Coordinator

Look for monthly discussions of this book on the TLC calendar.

Join Christine and Lance in reading From Brain to Mind: Using Neuroscience to Guide Change in Education by James Zull over the course of the spring 2015 semester. The book discussions will not be extremely formal, but they will foster faculty growth through conversations surrounding this book. Therefore, you should read the designated chapters before the session(s) you plan to attend.

James Zull’s book From Brain to Mind: Using Neuroscience to Guide Change in Education calls for a shift in how we perceive the instruction based on our current neurological understanding of the learning process. He describes the way information moves from working to long-term memory where it becomes part of our knowledge base used to generate new ideas, reason and problem solve.  Zull posits that metacognition lies at the root of all learning and offers educators practical advice on ways to utilize this awareness in transforming the way we perceive teaching and learning.

On this date, participants will discussion Chapter Five: Getting the Picture; Chapter Six: Basics; and Chapter Seven: Creating Memory.


Thursday, March 26
2:00 – 3:00 p.m.
EIT Portfolio Open House
Presented by Excellence in Teaching Committee and previous EIT Recipients

Drop in and examine award-winning teaching portfolios, both past and future!  This session is an opportunity for EIT Award nominees to ask final questions, get advice from previous EIT Award winners, and share their portfolios-in-progress with a supportive audience. Refreshments will be served.


Friday, March 27
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) Information Session
Presented by Gabby McCutchen, Director, Teaching-Learning Center

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) is the scholarly study of teaching and learning in higher education. The field of study features (1) research done by classroom instructors and (2) an expectation of publication of the research. All Durham Tech faculty are invited to attend this information session to learn more about SoTL and the upcoming opportunities to participate in a mini-sabbatical from teaching in order to conduct a SoTL project. Participants will learn the eligibility criteria, application process, and the expectations around the SoTL project.


Friday, March 27
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Blended, Shaken, and Stirred Instruction in Hybrid Classes
Panelists include Marisa Sullivan, Instructor, Psychology; Kerry Cantwell, Chair/Instructor, First-Year Experience; Theresa McCoy, Instructor, Medical Terminology; Automotive Technology Instructors

Durham Tech has offered hybrid courses for over 10 years in an effort to provide flexible course scheduling for students and to maximize instructional resources. However, hybrid classes rarely get the focus that online instruction and face-to-face instruction receive. In this panel discussion, experienced hybrid instructors will share tips for deciding what course content to put online, tracking attendance online, assessing student learning, orienting students to hybrid instruction, and more! While we will discuss our Sakai sites, please note that this is not a training session for Sakai tools. Instructors of online, hybrid, and face-to-face classes are invited to attend.


Tuesday, March 31
1:00 – 2:00 p.m.

Hear Students’ Voices: Results from the Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory Survey
Presented by Greg Stilley, Coordinator, Institutional Research and Evaluation

During the Fall 2014 term, students were asked to participate in the Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI) survey. Come hear what Durham Tech students have to say about Durham Tech. We will discuss students’ responses to instructional effectiveness, academic advising, registration, and more! We will also discuss how well we perform with our students compared to national data. All employees and students are welcomed to attend.


A P R I L


Thursday, April 9
1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Teaching Strategies to Help Non-Native English Speakers Succeed in Higher Education Writing Assignments
Presented by Paula Wilder, Coordinator/Instructor, Academic English as a Foreign Language

The immigration population in the U.S. has increased over the last ten years, and among the fifty states, North Carolina has the fastest growing immigrant population, thus, a fast growing English for Academic Purposes (EAP) demand. As a result, community colleges have begun to see an increase in the number of English language learners (ELLs). Curriculum teachers may find that many of their students are not accustomed to the rigor of college academic writing. Therefore, it is important for curriculum teachers to use explicit organizational explanations since students’ first language writing may have different expectations. As a result, instructors need to employ strategies of prewriting and revising for ELLs as it pertains to organization as well as grammar and mechanics. This workshop will provide you with specific strategies to help ELLs succeed in higher education academic writing in any genre or discipline.


Friday, April 10
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Financial Aid Literacy Workshop
Presented by Kerry Cantwell, Chair/Instructor, First-Year Experience

Financial aid literacy is an important component of the college culture theme that students study in ACA 122: College Transfer Success. As the cost of attendance in higher education continues to rise rapidly and job stability and growth rise slowly, more and more students rely on a combination of financial aid sources to pay for college. In this workshop, Kerry will teach faculty and staff the lessons that ACA students learn about financial aid, including the most common sources of financial aid, the criteria for Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP), and the possible financial aid statuses.  We will also take a look at some scenarios that demonstrate how different grades and situations impact SAP.


A D D I T I O N A L  T L C  A C T I V I T Y !

Friday, April 10
12:00 – 12:30 p.m.
New Faculty Mentoring Info Session
Presented by Lance Lee, Coordinator, Faculty Development

Join Lance for a brief presentation and discussion of a new mentoring program for new faculty. The new faculty mentoring program will be piloted in Fall 2015. Experienced Durham Tech instructors are encouraged to attend the information session to learn more about how they can share their expertise with new colleagues.


A D D I T I O N A L  T L C  A C T I V I T Y !

Tuesday, April 14
2:00 – 2:30 p.m.
New Faculty Mentoring Info Session
Presented by Lance Lee, Coordinator, Faculty Development

Join Lance for a brief presentation and discussion of a new mentoring program for new faculty. The new faculty mentoring program will be piloted in Fall 2015. Experienced Durham Tech instructors are encouraged to attend the information session to learn more about how they can share their expertise with new colleagues.


Tuesday, April 14
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Student Motivation: Check In Before They Check Out
Presented by Gabby McCutchen, Director, Teaching-Learning Center

College students’ motivation is critical to their academic success because many college students experience greater autonomy than they ever had in high school and because many college students have competing goals, including work and family. This workshop will present a variety of frameworks through which we can better understand not only what contributing factors influence student motivation but also how instructors can positively influence student motivation. Workshop participants will be invited to share their own strategies for motivating students while evaluating several research-based strategies. Light refreshments will be provided.


Tuesday, April 21
2:00 – 3:00 p.m.
A New Structure for Collaborative and Informed Decision Making at Durham Tech
Presented by
Tom Jaynes, Vice President of Institutional Advancement, and Members of the Council on Committees

In order to sustain a “culture of involvement;” support Durham Tech’s aim to have “broad participation by Durham Technical Community College employees and students;” and position our college as a first choice for employees in accordance with our new strategic plan, the college will adopt a new infrastructure to foster collaborative and informed decision making.  The Continuous Improvement Infrastructure Team began this work by examining our existing decision making structure at the college and presenting a great, new structure.   The new structure seeks to address the concerns of the campus community and provide guidelines to ensure our current practices match our intentions of promoting broad engagement among faculty, staff and students.  This workshop will provide an introduction to the new structures, expectations, timeline, and opportunities associated with the changes.


Wednesday, April 22
2:30 – 3:30 p.m.
Faculty Development Page Turners
Facilitated by Christine Dove, Sociology Instructor; and Lance Lee, Spanish Instructor and Faculty Development Coordinator

Look for monthly discussions of this book on the TLC calendar.

Join Christine and Lance in reading From Brain to Mind: Using Neuroscience to Guide Change in Education by James Zull over the course of the spring 2015 semester. The book discussions will not be extremely formal, but they will foster faculty growth through conversations surrounding this book. Therefore, you should read the designated chapters before the session(s) you plan to attend.

James Zull’s book From Brain to Mind: Using Neuroscience to Guide Change in Education calls for a shift in how we perceive the instruction based on our current neurological understanding of the learning process. He describes the way information moves from working to long-term memory where it becomes part of our knowledge base used to generate new ideas, reason and problem solve.  Zull posits that metacognition lies at the root of all learning and offers educators practical advice on ways to utilize this awareness in transforming the way we perceive teaching and learning.

On this date, participants will discussion Chapter Eight: Using Memory; Chapter Nine: Purpose and Principles for Education; and Chapter Ten: The Connecting Thread.


Wednesday, April 29
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Teaching Students How to Learn: Strategies for Success
Presented by Todd Zakrajsek,
Executive Director, Academy of Educators in the School of Medicine, UNC-Chapel Hill

Even when faculty employ the best teaching strategies, students cannot be optimally successful unless they understand their own learning processes. The good news is that there is a plethora of emerging research in the area of the science of learning. That said, understanding and applying findings of cognitive neuroscientists, psychologists, and education specialists in ways that can be used by students is difficult. This workshop will assist faculty to better understand and implement the newest findings in the science of learning so that students may better understand how they acquire, retain, and recall new information. Light refreshments will be provided.


M A Y


Friday, May 8
10:00 – 11:30 a.m.
Favorite Tech Tools
Presented by Instructional Technologies Staff

It’s the seventh annual “favorite tech tools” sharing session! Instructional Technologies staff will share some of our favorite tech tools for instruction. The focus is on “low barrier” tools that are free (or cheap) and relatively easy to jump in and start using without training. We’ll discuss examples of ways to use the tools to enhance instruction. Light refreshments will be provided.